Moodle


Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education
University of Wisconsin-Madison
194-550 Medical Aspects of Disability Syllabus
Spring 2006

Class Time: 11:00 – 1:45 p.m. Tuesdays
Location: K6/120 Clinical Science Center (CSC)

Professor: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Office: 432 North Murray Street, Room 409
Telephone: (608) 263-7785
Fax: (608) 262-8108
E-Mail: rlynch@education.wisc.edu
Office Hours: Mondays, 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. or by appointment

Teaching Assistant: Jill Bezyak
Telephone: (608) 262-7498
Office Location: 432 N. Murray St., Rm. 421
E-Mail: jvandershie@wisc.edu
Office Hours: Thursdays, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m. or by appointment

[email protected] logon to course homepage: https://uwmad.courses.wisconsin.edu/


I. COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

A. Rehabilitation counselor knowledge and skill proficiencies related to medical information as per the COUNCIL ON REHABILITATION EDUCATION (CORE) ACCREDITATION MANUAL (http://core-rehab.org/manual/manual.html)

C.9 MEDICAL, FUNCTIONAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF DISABILITY
Knowledge areas:
• The human body system
• Medical terminology
• Medical, functional, environmental and psychosocial aspects of
 Physical disabilities
 Psychiatric rehabilitation
 Substance abuse
 Cognitive disability
 Sensory disability
 Developmental disability
• Assistive technology
• Dual diagnosis and the workplace
• The concept of functional capacity
• Wellness and illness prevention concepts and strategies

Outcomes as demonstrated by the ability to:
C.9.1 explain basic medical aspects of the human body system and disabilities;
C.9.2 access resources for researching disability information;
C.9.3 explain functional capacity implications of medical and psychosocial information;
C.9.4 determine the need for assistive technology and the appropriate intervention resources;
C.9.5 apply working knowledge of the impact of disability on the individual, the family, and the environment;
C.9.6 support consumer empowerment and advocacy as it relates to medical treatment;
C.9.7 utilize existing or acquired information about the existence, onset, severity, progression, and expected duration of an individual's disability; and
C.9.8 consult with medical professionals regarding functional capacities, prognosis, and treatment plans for consumers.

B. Specific goals for this course:

THE STUDENT WILL LEARN:
- a basic vocabulary of common medical terminology, medical treatments and procedures
- to understand the functional impact of chronic illnesses, serious injuries, and other disabling conditions
- to understand principles of health and wellness that can improve the lives of persons with chronic illnesses and disability
- to relate medical information to rehabilitation counseling and rehabilitation planning
- to understand the roles of various health care professionals and the process of interdisciplinary health and rehabilitation teamwork
- to become familiar with medical treatments, complementary and alternative medicine approaches, assistive technology, health promotion, and prevention efforts to reduce or accommodate for the functional limitations imposed by chronic health conditions
- to identify the vocational, social, and independent living implications of various medical disabilities

UPON COMPLETION OF THIS COURSE, THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
- translate medical information into rehabilitation goals and recommendations
- assist clients in understanding the functional implications of their medical condition
- assist clients in assessing the potential benefits of medical treatments, health promotion, recommendations, services, and accommodations
- communicate with and function effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary health care team
- use medical reference/resource books, continuing education, journals and professional consultation for keeping up to date on medical and health promotion information
- be able to read, interpret, and utilize medical reports and utilize the information for rehabilitation planning



II. REQUIRED READING
Note: Students are responsible for completing all reading assignments prior to each class session. The text is available for purchase through University Bookstore. Additional readings for the course (listed below under “Additional Required Readings”) can be found on electronic reserves which is accessible through the MyUW. Login and click on the Academic tab; courses with reserves will have a “Library/Reserve” link; link to e-reserves through 194-550.

A. Textbook
Zaretsky, H. H., Richter, E. F., & Eisenberg, M. G.(Eds.) (2005). Medical aspects of disability (3rd edition). New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

B. E-Reserve Readings (accessible through MyUW portal)

Balfour, G. W. (2002). Evaluating upper extremity function and impairment. In M.G. Brodwin, F. Tellez & S. K. Brodwin (Eds.), Medical, psychosocial, and vocational aspects of disability (2nd ed., pp. 293-304). Athens, GA: Elliott & Fitzpatrick.

Brannon, L. & Feist, J. (2004). Exercising. In Health psychology: An introduction to behavior and health (5th ed., pp. 453-482). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Clawson, L. R. (2002). Orthotics, amputation, and prosthetics. In M.G. Brodwin, F. Tellez & S. K. Brodwin (Eds.), Medical, psychosocial, and vocational aspects of disability (2nd ed., pp. 305-315). Athens, GA: Elliott & Fitzpatrick.

Copeland, M. E. (2001). Wellness recovery action plan: A system for monitoring, reducing and eliminating uncomfortable or dangerous physical symptoms and emotional feelings. In C. Brown (Ed.), Recovery and wellness: Models of hope and empowerment for people with mental illness (pp. 127-150). New York: Haworth Press.

Felton, J. S. (2002). Medical terminology. In M.G. Brodwin, F. Tellez & S. K. Brodwin (Eds.), Medical, psychosocial, and vocational aspects of disability (2nd ed., pp. 15-26). Athens, GA: Elliott & Fitzpatrick.

Fleming, J. O (2002). Prognosis and management. In Diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis (1st ed, pp. 223-251.). Caddo, OK: Professional Communications, Inc.
Gallagher-Lepak, S., Deery, K., Chan, F., Murphy, C. M., & Leahy, M. J. (2005). Clinical pharmacology in rehabilitation case management. In F. Chan, M. J. Leahy, & J. L. Saunders (Eds.), Case management for rehabilitation health professionals (2nd ed.), Vol. 2. (pp. 64-86). Osage Beach, MO: Aspen Professional Services.

Klein, N. E. (2002). Plastic and reconstructive surgery. In M.G. Brodwin, F. Tellez & S. K. Brodwin (Eds.), Medical, psychosocial, and vocational aspects of disability (2nd ed., pp. 81- 94). Athens, GA: Elliott & Fitzpatrick.


C. E-Reserve Readings (continued)

Leskowitz, E. D. (2003). Chronic pain. In E. Leskowitz, Complimentary and alternative medicine in rehabilitation (pp. 363-372). New York: Elsevier Science.

Lynch, R. T. (2005). Promotion of health and enhanced life functioning for individuals with traumatic injuries and chronic health conditions. In F. Chan, M. J. Leahy, & J. L. Saunders (Eds.), Case management for rehabilitation health professionals (2nd ed.), Vol. 2. (pp. 44-63). Osage Beach, MO: Aspen Professional Services.

Nosek, M. A. (2005). Wellness in the context of disability. In J. E. Myers & T. J. Sweeney (Eds.), Counseling for wellness: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 139-150). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Putnam, M., Geenen, S., Powers, L., Saxton, M., Finney, S. & Dautel, P. (2003). Health and wellness: People with disabilities discuss barriers and facilitators to well being. Journal of Rehabilitation, 69(1), p. 37-45.

Sarafino, E. P. (2006). Health-related behavior and health promotion. In Health psychology: Biopsychosocial interactions (5th ed., pp. 139-170). New York: NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Sarafino, E. P. (2006). Stress, biopsychosocial factors, and illness. In Health psychology: Biopsychosocial interactions (5th ed., pp. 86-115). New York: NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

C. Other Assigned Reading as handouts or website readings


III. RECOMMENDED REFERENCES AND RESOURCES

The Merck Manual
http://www.merck.com/mrkshared/mmanual/home.jsp

Health Web
http://healthweb.org/

Medical Dictionaries
Online dictionaries: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mplusdictionary.html

IV. COURSE STRUCTURE AND EXPECTATIONS
The format for class sessions will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, and other
learning exercises. Students will be expected to:
a) complete the assigned reading(s) prior to each class session,
b) attend the entire class session each week,
c) complete all assigned activities on time. Topic papers can be submitted earlier than the deadline date of 4/4/06. If you would like suggestions to improve your paper, you must turn your draft in at least two weeks prior to the final due date (i.e., 3/21/2006) and request feedback for improvement. Any paper turned in within two weeks of the final
due date or on the final due date will be considered the final version and graded “as is”.

Students are urged to seek writing assistance to improve writing skills: Call the Writing Center (263-1992), use the UW-Madison On-LineWriting Center http://www.wisc.edu/writing/index.html), or consult with the professor or TA for the course.

"I wish to fully include persons with disabilities in this course. Please let me know if you need any special accommodations in the curriculum, instruction, or assessments of this course to enable you to fully participate. I will try to maintain the confidentiality of the information you share with me."

V. REQUIRED ACTIVITIES
A. Examinations and on-line Quizzes
- Three (3) unit exams given on the dates specified in the course outline (2/21/2006; 3/28/2006; 5/2/2006); 40 points possible on each exam; exam content will cover material from assigned readings, class lectures and discussions since the previous exam [including related medical terminology from the readings.] Review questions
will be provided to guide you in preparing for exams.
- 40 points of on-line quiz questions related to assigned readings. In order to obtain credit, the quiz for the week will need to be completed prior to class (i.e., before Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m.). The quiz questions will only be available for two (2) hours once you look at them so don’t open the quiz until you are ready to take it.

B. Disability Paper
Each student will prepare a paper on a specific disability/medical condition. The purpose of this learning activity is to increase your knowledge of the medical, functional, vocational, and independent living implications of a particular disability/medical condition. You are strongly urged to select a topic that is new to you in order to expand your knowledge base.

The paper must include the following information on the selected topic:
- description of the topic (prevalence, incidence rates, causes, symptoms, etc.)
(12 points)
- discussion of how the medical condition/illness affects functioning, common
complications and concerns (12 points)

- accommodations, treatments, strategies, assistive devices available to reduce/prevent
limitations and to promote health (12 points)
- references, use of APA style, and professional quality (e.g., neatness, grammar,
spelling, writing quality) (4 points)

The topic paper must be typed, double-spaced (approximately 10-12 pages excluding references), and in APA 5th ed. style. You are expected to search journals, chapters, and books and to read at least 10 additional references, not counting your assigned readings. ). Prioritize your searches to current/recent documents (e.g., preferably within the past 10-15 years). Do not rely on web-based sites only – you are expected to review the professional literature about your topic (e.g., professional journals and texts). Each paper is expected to be logically organized, grammatically correct, proofread, and neat.

Grading will be based on comprehensiveness (i.e., coverage of all required elements) and writing quality. Each student is required to submit their topic title with a draft plan and a list of key references for the paper no later than 2/28/2006. This will give students the opportunity to get suggestions and feedback prior to submitting the final paper that is due by 4/4/2006. Reminder: If you would like suggestions to improve your paper, you must turn your draft in at least two weeks prior to the final due date (i.e., 3/21/2006) and request feedback for improvement. Any paper turned in within two weeks of the final
due date or on the final due date will be considered the final version and graded “as is”.

C. Resource Guide
Develop a resource guide for a rehabilitation intervention, assistive technology, or health promotion program that can reduce the functional limitations associated with chronic medical conditions. Your resource guide can presented in a folder, binder, or on a website (e.g., submitted to the [email protected] course homepage). You are encouraged to include photos, sketches, and other materials that would be useful to a reader of your resource guide (e.g., photos of different styles of wheelchairs or prostheses). The intervention or assistive technology topic that you select should be from the list below (unless pre-approved by Prof. Lynch). Note that these topics are for improvement and maintenance of health and wellness (rather than surgical or pharmacological interventions).

1. mobility aids (e.g., walkers, scooters, wheelchairs)
2. transportation aids (e.g., hand controls, lifts)
3. communication aids and systems
4. orthoses
5. prostheses
6. service animals (e.g., guide dogs)
7. oxygen therapy
8. mechanical ventilators
9. ergonomics (e.g., specify a context such as office, assembly line, health care)
10. respiratory therapy and breathing training (e.g., asthma, cystic fibrosis)
11. smoking cessation models
12. pressure garments and therapy (e.g., burns)
13. sensory aids for vision loss (e.g., magnifiers, enlargers, speech output devices)


14. sensory aids for hearing loss (e.g., hearing aids, TDD, flashing alarms)
15. TENS (trancutaneous electrical nerve stimulation)
16. relaxation training, self hypnosis
17. acupuncture
18. massage
19. diet/nutrition (e.g., diet modifications for cardiovascular disease or diabetes)
20. biofeedback
21. catheterization options and bladder/bowel management
22. yoga
23. telehealth or telemedicine
24. functional restoration, work hardening, or occupational rehabilitation
25. homeopathy
26. art and/or music therapy
27. seating and positioning systems
28. adaptive devices and methods for recreational pursuits
29. T’ai Chi
30. “Renewing Life” programs
31. mindfulness meditation or mindfulness based stress reduction
32. memory retraining and cognitive rehabilitation

Select a topic that is different and unrelated to your disability topic paper (e.g., if your disability topic paper is on spinal cord injury, then do not select wheelchairs, driving adaptations, or catheterization for your health resource guide). Also, select a topic that is new and unfamiliar but interesting to you. Grading of the resource guide will be based on comprehensiveness and professional quality. Sources of all materials should be identified on the picture or item and in a bibliography. The resource guide is due 4/18 /2006.

VI. GUIDELINES FOR ASSIGNED PAPERS
A. Assignments are due on the dates specified. If you have any difficulties meeting the deadlines, please discuss the situation with the instructor.

B. All assignments must be typed. The paper will be evaluated on content, organization, comprehensiveness, originality, neatness, clarity of expression, understanding and interpretation of the material and conciseness.

VII. STUDENT EVALUATION
On-line quizzes 3-4 points each 40 points
3 examinations 40 points each 120 points
Disability paper 40 points 40 points
Resource guide 40 points 40 points
Class participation 10 points 10 points
Total Points 250 points

Extra Credit: Limited extra credit options will be available through extra on-line and classroom exam items.


Final grades will be calculated as follows:
A = 92-100% of possible points (230-250 points)
AB = 85-91% of possible points (213-229 points)
B = 78-84% of possible points (195-212 points)
BC = 73-77% of possible points (183-194 points)
C = 67-72% of possible points (168-182 points)
D = 61-66% of possible points (152-167 points)
F = 60% or less of possible points (151 points or less)



VIII. COURSE OUTLINE


1/17/06

11:00am – 1:45pm
Topics: - Course introduction and review of syllabus
- A functional approach to medical information for rehabilitation counseling

Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.



1/24/06

11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30 - 12:30pm
Topic: Ideas and beliefs about health, wellness, illness, and disability

Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.

Required
Readings: E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Lynch
2) Nosek


12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: - Body systems
- Medical terminology

Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.

Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 2)

E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Felton






1/31/06
11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion
11:30 - 12:30pm
Topic: Stress, biopsychosocial factors, and illness
Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Required
Readings: E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Sarafino
12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: - Health-related behavior and health promotion
- Healthy People 2010 targets
- Complementary and alternative medicine
Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 28)
E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Sarafino
Web-based reading: http://www.healthypeople.gov/Document/HTML/uih/uih_4.htm


2/7/06
Class will meet at Natatorium. Room location will be announced beforehand by Professor Lynch.
11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion
11:30 – 12:00 (noon)
Topic: Exercise and disability: strategies for enhancing functioning
Lecturer: Timothy Gattenby, Faculty Associate
UW-Madison Department of Kinesiology
Required
Readings: E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Brannon & Feist
2) Putnam
12:15 -12:45 pm Tour of adaptive exercise program
12:45 – 1:45 pm
Topic 1: - Occupational injuries
- Ergonomics
- Carpal tunnel syndrome
Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Required
Readings: E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Balfour




2/14/06
11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30 - 12:30pm
Topic: - Pain—Nature and symptoms, and management
- Rheumatic diseases
Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al.(Chapters 9 & 23)
E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Leskowitz

12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: Medical information training session in Ebling Library
Lecturer: Sandra Phelps, Senior Academic Librarian, Health Sciences Library



2/21/06

11:00-12:30pm

EXAMINATION #1 (40 points)

12:45-1:45pm
Topic: Introduction to pharmacology

Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.

Required
Readings: E-Reserve Reading(s): 1) Gallagher-Lepak, Deery, et al.






2/28/06

11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30-12:30pm
Topic: Epilepsy
Lecturer: Jana Jones, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Neurology
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 11)

12:45-1:45pm
Topic: Burn rehabilitation
Lecturer: Karen Willems, Occupational Therapist, Medical Surgical Unit,
UW Hospital and Clinics
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 6)
E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Klein

DRAFT PLAN FOR TOPIC PAPERS AND RESOURCE GUIDES DUE


3/7/06

11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30-12:30pm
Topic: Multiple Sclerosis/Neuromuscular disease
Lecturer: John Fleming, M.D., Professor, Dept. of Neurology,
UW Medical School
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 15)
E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Fleming

12:45-1:45pm
Topic: Traumatic brain injury/strokes
Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapters 5 & 25)






SPRING RECESS—NO CLASS (3/11/06 – 3/19/06)


3/21/06

11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30-12:30pm
Topic: Mental retardation, learning disabilities and cerebral palsy
Lecturer: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D.
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapters 14 & 18)

12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: Substance abuse
Lecturer: Richard Brown, M.D., Associate Professor, Family Medicine,
UW-Medical School
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 26)


3/28/06

11:00-12:30pm

EXAMINATION #2 (40 points)

12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: Mood disorders, Anxiety disorders, and personality disorders

Lecturer: William Gardner, Emeritus Professor, Rehabilitation Psychology
and Special Education
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 20, pp. 512-514)




4/4/06

11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30 – 12:30pm
Topic: Diabetes
Lecturer: Mary Bruskewitz, Senior Clinical Nurse Specialist,
UW Hospital and Clinics
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 10)

12:45-1:45pm
Topic: Amputations and assistive technology (orthotics & prosthetics)
Lecturer: Jerry Ebert, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, UW-Madison Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation

Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 19)
E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Clawson

DISABILITY PAPER DUE


4/11/06
11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion

11:30 - 12:30pm
Topic: Vision impairment
Lecturer: Ronald Klein, M.D., Professor, Ophthalmology, UW Medical School
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 27)

12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: Chronic mental illness (schizophrenia)
Lecturer: Robert Factor, M.D., UW Psychiatric Institute and Clinics
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 20 except pp. 512-514)
E-Reserve reading(s): 1) Copeland




4/18/06
11:00 – 11:30 am Class activity and discussion
11:30am – 12:30pm
Topic: Respiratory diseases
Lecturer: Guillermo doPico, M.D., Professor, Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine,
UW Medical School
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 21)
12:45 – 1:45pm
Topic: Spinal Cord Injury
Lecturer: George Thomas, M.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopedics and
Rehabilitation, UW Medical School
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 24)


RESOURCE GUIDE DUE


4/25/06
11:00-12:30pm
Topic: - Personal reflections on living with cardiac disease (11:00 – 11:30 a.m.)
- Cardiac impairments (11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)

Lecturer(s): Jean Einerson, Program Director, UW Hospital Cardiac Rehabilitation
Outpatient Program
Taina Nytes, M.S.
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapter 8)

12:45-1:45pm
Topic: Communication impairment and adaptive technology for
augmentative communication
Lecturer: Julie Gamradt, M.S., S.L.P., TRACE Research and Development
Center Staff, UW-Madison Waisman Center
Required
Readings: Textbook reading(s): Zaretsky et al. (Chapters 12 & 32)




5/2/06
11:00-12:30pm

EXAMINATION # 3- (40 points)



Revised 2/14/2006

Last modified: Friday, 1 December 2006, 01:53 PM