Moodle

Adult Cognitive Assessment
Rehabilitation Psychology & Special Education 980
Fall Semester 2006-07

Professor: Ruth Torkelson Lynch, Ph.D., Professor
Office: 432 North Murray Street, Room 409
Phone: (608) 263-7785
Fax: (608) 262-8108
E-Mail: rlynch@education.wisc.edu
Office Hours: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. on Mondays or by appointment

Teaching Assistant: Jill Bezyak
Office: 432 North Murray Street, Room 305
E-mail: jvandershie@wisc.edu

Class Time: 9:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Wednesdays
Class Location: Room 323 Educational Sciences
Lab: Education and Psychological Training Clinic/Center (EPTC),
Room 316 Educational Sciences

[email protected] course page available through MyUW portal.

Course Description: The primary goals of this course are as follows: to explore the concepts of intelligence and cognition in adults; to analyze the issues and controversies related to assessment of intellectual and cognitive functioning; to develop competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the WAIS III; to become familiar with other cognitive assessment approaches (e.g., neuropsychological assessment, memory assessment); and to consider clinical practice and rehabilitation applications for cognitive assessment. The course has two parts: a didactic component involving lecture, presentations, and discussion; and a competency-based laboratory component for administration, scoring, and interpretation of the WAIS-III.

"I wish to fully include persons with disabilities in this course. Please let me know if you need any special accommodations in the curriculum, instruction, or assessments of this course to enable you to fully participate. I recognize the confidentiality of the information you share with me."

Course Objectives

This course will focus on cognitive assessment of adults within the rehabilitation process. The specific
course objectives are to develop knowledge and skills as follows:
a) determine what type of cognitive assessment information that would be useful for rehabilitation and life planning
b) identify appropriate assessment tools to gather the information
c) understand the core methodology of assessment procedures (e.g., reliability, validity, standardization)
d) understand the process involved to administer, score, and interpret results of assessment procedures with particular emphasis on the WAIS-III


Course Objectives (cont’d)
e) develop skills related to report writing of assessment results
f) utilize the implications of client assessment for rehabilitation and vocational/life planning with the client
g) develop an awareness of limits and ethical issues relevant to cognitive assessment
h) develop awareness of cognitive assessment considerations relevant to gender, racial and ethnic background, and disability
i) understand the applications of cognitive assessment in a variety of rehabilitation, school and work settings


Topical Outline of the Didactic Component

I. History and Theoretical Background of Cognitive Assessment
A. Theories of intelligence and cognition
B. Psychometric and functional assessment of cognition

II. Review of General Assessment Considerations
A. Test development and standardization
B. Test administration and behavioral observations
C. Objectivity

III. Wechsler Series: WAIS-III
A. Development (Wechsler-Bellevue I to WAIS to WAIS-R to WAIS-III)
B. Psychometric Issues (e.g., test-retest, validity and reliability)
C. Administration
D. Scoring
E. Interpretation
F. Report Writing

IV. Issues
A. Age, race, gender issues and IQ
B. Special populations
C. Heredity and environment

V. Diagnostic Applications/Profile Interpretations
A. Brain damage
B. Mental retardation
C. Gifted
D. Learning disability

VI. Rehabilitation Practice Applications
A. Relationship between assessments and everyday life functioning
B. Using assessment to plan clinical interventions (e.g., cognitive retraining, behavioral programs)
C. Interpreting cognitive assessment information with other assessment data (e.g., achievement tests, personality tests, memory tests)

VII. Legal and Ethical Issues


Required Texts (Note: The Kaufman & Lichtenberger (1999) and Kaufman & Lichtenberger (2002) are available at the University Bookstore; WAIS-III manuals are available to borrow with the WAIS-III kits)

Kaufman, A. S., & Lichtenberger, E. O. (1999). Essentials of WAIS-III assessment. John Wiley & Sons: New York.

Hebben, N. & Milberg, W. (2002). Essentials of neuropyschological assessment. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Psychological Corporation. (1997). WAIS-III administration and scoring manual. Author: San Antonio, Texas.

Psychological Corporation. (1997). WAIS-III –WMS-III technical manual. Author: San Antonio, Texas.

Other Required Readings--available at [email protected] course website

Braden, J. P. (2003). Accommodating clients with disabilities on the WAIS-III and WMS. In D.S. Tulsky, D.H. Saklofske, et al. (Eds.), Clinical interpretation of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Practical resources for the mental health professional (pp. 451-486). San Diego: Academic Press.

Gardner, H. (2003). Three distinct meanings of intelligence. In R. J. Sternberg, J. Lautrye, & T. I. Lubart (Eds.), Models of intelligence: International perspectives (pp. 43-54). Washington, D. C.: American Psychological Association.

Kaplan, R.M. & Succuzzo, D. P. (2005). Test bias. In Psychological testing: Principles, applications, and issues (6th ed, pp. 538-572). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

Kaufman, A. S. & Lichtenberger, E. O. (Eds.). (2006). Individual differences for adolescents and adults on gender, ethnicity, urban-rural residence, and socioeconomic status. In Assessing adolescent and adult intelligence (3rd ed., pp. 96-126). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Kaufman, A. S. & Lichtenberger, E. O. (Eds.). (2006). I Q tests: Their history, use, validity, and intelligent interpretation. In Assessing Adolescent and adult intelligence (3rd ed., pp.1-23). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Lacritz, L. H., & Cullum, C. M. (2003). The WAIS-III and WMS-III: Practical and frequently asked questions. In D. S. Tulsky, D.H. Saklofske, C. J. Chelune, R. K. Heaton, R. J. Ivnik, R. Bornstein, A. Prifitera, & M. F. Ledbetter (Eds.), Clinical interpretation of the WAIS-III and WMS-III (pp. 491-532). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

Lichtenberger, E. O., Mather, N., Kaufman, N. L., & Kaufman, A. S. (Eds.). (2004). Behavioral observations. In Essentials of assessment report writing (pp. 55-81). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons, Inc.



Lichtenberger, E. O., Mather, N., Kaufman, N. L., & Kaufman, A. S. (Eds.). (2004). Tests results and interpretation. In Essentials of assessment report writing (pp. 82-104). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Lopez, S. J., Synder, C. R. & Rasmussen, H. N. (2003). Striking a vital balance: Developing a complementary focus on human weakness and strength through positive psychological assessment. In S. J. Lopez & C. R. Snyder (Eds.), Positive psychological assessment: A handbook of models and measures (pp. 3-20). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Snyder, C. R., Lopez, S. J., Edwards, L. M., Teramoto Pedrotti, J. Prosser, E. C., LaRue Walton, S., Vehige Spalitto, S. & Ulven, J. C. (2003). Measuring and labeling the positive and negative. In S. J. Lopez & C. R. Snyder (Eds.), Positive psychological assessment: A handbook of models and measures (pp. 21-39). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Solson, R. L., MacLin, M. K., & MacLin, O. H. (Eds.). (2005). Introduction to cognitive psychology. In Cognitive psychology (7th ed., pp. 1-32). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Required Testing Materials
• WAIS-III Kit (available for check-out from RPSE or EPTC: includes WAIS-III Administration and Scoring Manual and WAIS-III – WMS-III Technical Manual.)

• WAIS-III Record Forms, WAIS-III Response Booklets, (details will be discussed in class)
• Blank videotape for videotaped administration

Course Requirements

Didactic Component:
• 1) on-line quizzes (45 points) related to the assigned readings. In order to obtain credit, the quiz for the week will need to be completed prior to class (i.e. before 9:00 a.m. on
Wednesdays)
2) class participation and discussion (15 points)
3) two brief presentations with outlines/handouts (60 points)
a) overview of cognitive assessment instrument (30 points)
- select an instrument(s) with approval of the instructor; each student will present a different instrument(s) (due to brevity of some instruments, some students will
present more than one; for WMS-III and Wood** Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities, two students can present as a team)



- sample list of assessment tools (available for checkout from the department
assessment library) NOTE: * are priorities
** suggested for 2 person teams and are priorities
Adaptive Behavior Assessment System (ABAS)
AAMR Adaptive Behavior Scales
Adult Mental Abilities Test (Schaie-Thurstone)
Bender Gestalt II—Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt, 2nd edition
Benton Visual Retention Test
Beta Examination—Revised, 2nd edition (BETA-III)
Booklet Category Test
Brief Neuropsychological Cognitive Examination (BNCE)
California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)
Cognistat
Cognitive Behavior Rating Scales
Cognitive Symptom Checklists
Comprehensive Test of Non-Verbal Intelligence (CTONI)
Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT)
Kaufman Short Neuropsychological Assessment Procedure (K-SNAP)
Memory Assessment Scales
Neurobehavioral Functioning Inventory (NFI)
Quick Neurological Screening Test, 2nd rev. edition (QNST-II)
Raven's Progressive Matrices
Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANKS)
Scales of Independent Behavior--Revised
Stroop Color and Word Test
Test of Nonverbal Intelligence--Third Edition (TONI-3)
Trail Making Test for Adults
Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence*
Wechsler Memory Scale-III**
Wechsler Memory Scale—III Abbreviated*
Wisconsin Card Sorting Test
Wood**-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities**

b) cognitive assessment topics and issues (30 points)
- select a topic with approval of the instructor; each student will present a different
topic.
- sample ideas for topics:
issues in test-retest or serial assessments (e.g., reliably interpreting change)
assessment and management of awareness disorders
assessment of memory functioning
assessment of executive functioning
assessment issues with specific populations (e.g., aging, adolescents)
computer-assisted cognitive assessment and rehabilitation
short forms
assessment of learning disabilities
comprehensive assessment of individuals with borderline IQ's


multicultural factors in cognitive assessment
neuropsychological assessment of persons with chronic mental illness
assessment of attention/concentration
affective disorders and cognitive functioning
assessment of creativity and giftedness
detection of exaggerated cognitive impairment
emotional intelligence (Goleman)
theory of multiple intelligences (Gardner)
establishing a pre-injury cognitive baseline
assessment of the non-native English speaker
cognitive assessment issues for persons with sensory impairments (hearing loss, vision loss)

Laboratory Component:
Competency-based training in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the WAIS-III will be the focus of the laboratory component of the course. Students will be expected to demonstrate competency using a formal mastery model. The process will be accomplished through a series of steps: demonstration, practice with test materials, scoring a sample WAIS-III, trial administrations (some with interpretive reports) and a final observed (videotaped) administration with report.

This component of the course stresses competency in the reliable and accurate administration, scoring and interpretation of the WAIS-III. The following are the specific administration
requirements for the WAIS-III:
1 scoring of a sample WAIS-III
5 administrations of the WAIS-III
2 with scoring/record form
2 with scoring/record form, and summary report
1 videotaped administration with scoring/record form, videotape, and summary report

WAIS-III kits will be available for you to check out during the course. Specific arrangements for forms, kits, and observation will be discussed in class. Students will be expected to ask each testing subject to read and sign a consent form for each test administered (see attached form). All test protocols should be kept confidential.

You will be expected to adhere to the schedule deadlines for WAIS-III test administrations as specified in the course outline. This will assist you in learning since you will get feedback for future administrations and reports. You will also get scoring and interpretation experience by discussing scoring issues in class.

The facilities and equipment of the Education and Psychological Training Clinic/Center (EPTC) (316 Educational Sciences Building) are available for use by students in this class. Students can use testing observation rooms (with videotaping capability). To reserve space and/or materials, call 265-6120; EPTC hours are 8:30-4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday or by email to Barb Lindemann ([email protected]).


Scoring Format
On-line Quizzes (9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8) 45 points

Class participation and discussion 15 points

Class Presentations 60 points
(Cognitive Assessment Instrument 30, Clinical issue 30)
Test Scoring and Administration 130 points
1 sample WAIS-III for scoring practice @ 5 points
2 WAIS-III test administrations with scoring/record
@ 15 pts. each = 30 points
2 WAIS-III test administration with scoring/record forms and
summary report @ 25 pts. each = 50 points
1 WAIS-III videotaped test administration with scoring/record form,
videotape, and summary report = 45 pts.

Grade Assignment:
A = 230-250 points (92 - 100% of possible points)
AB = 213-229 points (85 - 91% “ )
B = 195-212 points (78 - 84% “ )
BC = 183-194 points (73 - 77% “ )
C = 168-182 points (67 - 72% “ )
D = 152-167 points (61 - 66% “ )
F = 151 points or less (60% or less “ )



Course Outline


9/6/06
Topic: Course introduction and review of syllabus
Foundations of cognitive assessment

9/13/06
Topic: Contemporary and emerging theoretical perspectives of cognition and intelligence
Historical perspectives on assessment of cognition and intelligence

Required Readings:
Textbook(s):
Readings at [email protected]: 1) Gardner
2) Kaufman, Lichtenberger: IQ tests.
3) Solson et al.

9/20/06
Topic: Positive psychology and cognitive assessment
WAIS-III test development and structure

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Chapter 1
2) WAIS-III Administration & Scoring Manual: Chapters 1, 2 (pp. 11-19)
Readings at [email protected]: 1) Lopez, Snyder et al.
2) Snyder, Lopez et al.

9/27/06
Topic: Brief review of measurement (including reliability and validity)
WAIS-III: Standardization, norms development, reliability and validity
WAIS-III: General testing considerations

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Chapter 2 (pp. 15-27)
2) WAIS-III Technical Manual: Chapters 2, 3, 4
3) WAIS-III Administration & Scoring Manual: Chapter 3 (pp. 27-36)




10/4/06
Topic: Essentials of the interview and clinical history
WAIS-III: Subtest overview and administration guidelines

Required Readings:
Textbook(ssmile 1) Hebben & Milberg: Chapter 3
2) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Chapter 2 (pp. 27-59)
3) WAIS-III Administration & Scoring Manual: Chapter 3 (pp. 36-45)

10/11/06
Topic: WAIS-III: Subtest administration and scoring

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Chapter 3
2) WAIS-III Administration & Scoring Manual: Chapter 3 (pp. 45-62)
Readings at [email protected]: 1) Lacritz & Cullum

DUE: Completed sample WAIS-III record form

10/18/06
Topic: WAIS-III: Interpretation of subtests and profile analysis
WAIS-III: Strengths and weaknesses
Analysis of VIQ-PIQ differences

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Hebben & Milberg: Chapter 5
2) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Chapters 4 & 5

DUE: WAIS-III Test Administration #1 (record form)

10/25/06
Topic: Contextual issues and ecological validity
Neuropsychological assessment approaches and principles
Cognitive assessment beyond IQ

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Hebben & Milberg: Chapters 1, 2, 4




11/1/06
Topic: Report writing and communicating results
Clinical applications and case studies

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Hebben & Milberg: Chapter 7
2) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Chapters 6 & 7
Readings at [email protected]: 1) Lichtenberger et al.: Behavioral observations
2) Lichtenberger et al: Tests results and interpretation
DUE: WAIS-III Test Administration #2 (record form)

11/8/06
Topic: Individual differences and IQ (e.g., gender, aging, socio-economic status, education,
occupation)
Special considerations: Accommodations, partial administrations, and practice effects
Legal and ethical considerations
Test bias or detection of differences?

Required Readings:
Textbook(s): 1) Hebben & Milberg: Chapter 6
Readings at [email protected]: 1) Braden
2) Kaplan & Saccuzzo
3) Kaufman & Lichtenberger: Individual differences …

11/15/06
Topic: Supplemental resources for assessment of intelligence and cognition:
student presentations

DUE: WAIS-III Test Administration #3 (record form & report)

11/22/06
Topic: Lab day

11/29/06
Topic: Supplemental resources for assessment of intelligence and cognition:
student presentations

DUE: WAIS-III Test Administration #4 (record form & report)



12/6/06
Topic: Clinical applications and issues in cognitive assessment:
student presentations


12/13/06
Topic: Clinical applications and issues in cognitive assessment:
student presentations

DUE: WAIS-III Test Administration #5 (record form, report, videotape)




Revised 8-22-2006
Consent for Practice Test Administration




I grant permission for , a graduate student enrolled in a Cognitive Assessment course at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, to administer an individual test to me. I understand that the purpose of this practice administration is to provide the student with necessary experience in test administration, and that currently, the student is not qualified to report test findings or interpret test results.





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Last modified: Monday, 18 December 2006, 11:32 AM